The Dairy Food Group

Evidence on dairy foods

The National Health and Medical Research Council have developed the Australian Dietary Guidelines providing up-to-date advice about the amount and kinds of foods Australians need to eat for health and wellbeing. Around 55,000 scientific publications were reviewed in the update of the guidelines with the evidence for the health benefits of milk, cheese and yogurt strengthening. 

The guidelines recognise the importance of milk, yogurt and cheese in supplying key nutrients and reducing the risk of several chronic diseases including the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers (refer to table below).

The guidelines are accompanied by the ‘Australian Guide to Healthy Eating’ and other resources for consumers and health professionals available at www.eatforhealth.gov.au.

We've collated some evidence statements below on food consumption and the associated health outcomes for consuming milk, yogurt, cheese and/or alternatives, mostly reduced fat.

Evidence Statement 
Grade 
Consumption of at least two serves per day of dairy foods (milk, yogurt and cheese) is associated with reduced risk of ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction 
Consumption of two or more serves of dairy foods per day is associated with reduced risk of stroke  
Consumption of three serves of low fat dairy foods is associated with reduced risk of hypertension 
Consumption of more than one serve of dairy foods per day, especially milk, is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer 
Consumption of three or more serves of milk per day is not associated with risk of renal cell cancer 
Consumption of three serves of any milk, cheese or yogurt products per day is associated with a reduced risk of hypertension 
Consumption of two to four serves of dairy foods per day is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome 
Consumption of at least one and a half serves of dairy foods (milk, yogurt, cheese) per day is associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes 
Consumption of more than one serve of milk per day is associated with reduced risk of rectal cancer 
C
Consumption of dairy products (particularly milk) is associated with improved bone mineral density 
Consumption of dairy foods is not associated with weight change or risk of obesity in adults 
Consumption of milk is not associated with BMI or change in BMI in childhood 
Adapted from The 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines, NHMRC, Canberra; Australia
For more information on the grading system refer to page 124 of The 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines, NHMRC, Canberra; Australia.

RSS Feed